What to Do in the Face of a Dispute

9 Mar

What do you do when your exclusive agent starts referring merchants to a different processor?  What if your residuals from your ISO are cut off, or if you don’t receive the hold-back payment from the buyer of your merchant portfolio?

These are the kind of disputes that regularly arise in the payments industry and which require immediate attention.  What should you do when faced with them?

First, gather up all relevant documents, including written agreements, emails and letters concerning the dispute as well as information that supports the other side.  Then, reach out to a lawyer knowledgeable and experienced in the industry.  Knowledge of the payments business is critical because courts will look to industry standards in interpreting contractual ambiguities.

Should you file a lawsuit right away?  We typically recommend, instead, that a demand letter be sent.  A demand letter lays out in some detail what your grievances are, why the contract or parties’ dealings support your position, and what you want the other side to do.  If you are the recipient of a demand letter, gather up the same materials and get them to your counsel right away.

The principal goal of a demand letter is to begin a discussion to reach a resolution of the dispute.  A resolution of a dispute, however, is not the same thing as capitulation.  It involves compromise and negotiation.  Why compromise?  Because litigation is expensive, time-consuming, distracting and the end result is always uncertain.  A negotiated resolution to a dispute is far preferable to one costing tens of thousands of dollars and dragging on for months if not years.

Of course, some disputes cannot be resolved amicably or are of such dire importance that immediate court intervention is necessary.  Under such circumstances, litigation may be the only recourse.

Litigation starts with preparing a complaint which sets forth facts and the plaintiff’s claims.  That document is filed with the court and is served on the other side.  The other side usually has 20 to 30 days to answer depending on the state.  The next step is usually written discovery, meaning a set of questions which need to be answered.  Following written discovery, usually depositions are taken where lawyers question witnesses under oath.  Once all discovery is complete, the parties often will file motions for summary judgment.  A motion for summary judgment asks the court to rule that there are no issues of fact requiring trial and that, as a matter of law, you are entitled to prevail on your claims.  Preparation of a good motion for summary judgment is an arduous task requiring the summation of all of the evidence gathered through the discovery process.  If the court finds that it is unable to grant summary judgment for either side, then the case will proceed to trial.

Litigation can be a lengthy, costly and distracting process.  It will consume many hours of internal personnel time.  Conventional wisdom says that 99% of commercial litigation matters get resolved before trial.  There is, therefore, no reason why a resolution could not have been reached at the demand letter stage rather than after 12 months of discovery and tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars of expense.  If you provide your lawyer with all relevant information at the outset of the dispute, significant costs may be avoided with little, if any, difference in the ultimate outcome.

 — Eric A. Linden, Attorney and Partner, Jaffe Raitt Heuer & Weiss, P.C.

Holli Targan

Attorney & Partner

htargan@jaffelaw.com

Leave a Comment Below

Leave a Reply

Why ask?